Bill Gephardt’s Garden Adventure With Master Gardener Leslie Woodmansee: Episode 2

Bill Gephardt and master gardener Leslie Woodmansee get down and dirty when talking gardening preps and early planting. Photo: Gephardt Daily

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SALT LAKE CITY, Utah, June 5, 2016 (Gephardt Daily) — Hello there, fellow gardeners!

It’s Bill G. here.

Hope you’ve been enjoying your garden as much as I’ve been enjoying mine the last few days.

We’re still a long way from a bountiful harvest; no need to tuck the napkin in just quite yet.

But I have faith.

And I have a secret weapon — certified master gardener Leslie Woodmansee.

In Episode 1 of Gephardt’s Garden Adventure, Leslie pointed out a number of nagging details, including the fact that I stink when it comes to soil preparation.

For instance, I always believed it was a grand idea to rototill the garden every year.

Seemed like a manly thing to do, plus I thought it was logical that grinding up all the leaves and pine needles and other ground cover, and returning their nutrients to the soil, was a good thing to do.

Wrong!

As Leslie was quick to point out, rototilling actually causes the soil to become more fine and compact over time. It makes it more difficult for tiny roots to reach out and find those vital nutrients.

Not only that, leaves tend to mold once they’re tilled into the soil. Moldy soil is the last thing you want.

So, what’s a gardener to do?

“The first order of business,” according to Leslie, “is to get to know your soil. Use test kits to determine your garden’s pH and nutrient levels, and then figure out the type of fertilizer you may need to balance any deficits.

“Also, be sure to follow instructions,” Leslie said. “Carefully calculate your garden’s square footage and mix your fertilizer accordingly. After that, gently turn your soil with hand tillers to prepare each bed for fertilizing, then evenly distribute your fertilizer, according to instructions.”

These are just a few of the tips we explore in Episode 2 of Gephardt’s Garden Adventure.

We also learn some nifty things about planting tomatoes and carrots.

To see Leslie take me to task, and to learn some truly valuable tips, click on the video player above.

Also, if you have any questions, be sure and submit them to the comment section below.

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