South Carolina Investigates Deputy’s Shooting of Home Invasion Victim

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South Carolina authorities launched an investigation into the shooting of a home invasion victim by a Charleston County Sheriff's Office deputy on May 7, 2015 in Hollywood, S.C. The victim was shot in the neck and hospitalized with serious injuries. File Photo: ChiccoDodiFC / ShutterStock

South Carolina Investigates Deputy’s Shooting of Home Invasion Victim

South Carolina authorities launched an investigation into the shooting of a home invasion victim by a Charleston County Sheriff's Office deputy on May 7, 2015 in Hollywood, S.C. The victim was shot in the neck and hospitalized with serious injuries. File Photo: ChiccoDodiFC / ShutterStock
South Carolina authorities launched an investigation into the shooting of a home invasion victim by a Charleston County Sheriff’s Office deputy on May 7, 2015 in Hollywood, S.C. The victim was shot in the neck and hospitalized with serious injuries. File Photo: ChiccoDodiFC / ShutterStock

CHARLESTON, S.C., May 8 (UPI) — South Carolina’s top law enforcement office has launched an investigation into the shooting of a home invasion victim by a sheriff’s deputy, officials said Friday.

Bryan Heyward called 911 Thursday morning to report two suspects trying to break into his family’s home in Hollywood, S.C. Officials said several minutes into the call, Heyward told the dispatcher that the suspects had made it into the home.

After exchanging gunfire with the assailants, Heyward says, he was shot by Charleston County sheriff’s deputy Keith Tyner.

Heyward, however, reportedly told police that the shooting was an accident — believing the deputy, who entered the home and saw him holding a .40-caliber handgun, mistakenly believed he was one of the perpetrators.

“He didn’t know who I was. He saw the gun,” Heyward said in a tape-recorded interview with police. “He thought I was the crook, and he shot.”

Heyward was shot in the right side of the neck and was hospitalized with what officials say are life-threatening injuries.

Tyner said he told Heyward to drop his handgun, and that he didn’t realize the armed man was the victim until after he’d shot him.

South Carolina’s State Law Enforcement Division announced Friday that it will review the shooting.

Heyward told the 911 dispatcher that the assailants, like himself, are black — raising the plausibility that the deputy genuinely mistook him for one of the suspects.

One of the alleged invaders was arrested later Thursday, and now faces charges of burglary and attempted murder.

Officials said Tyner, a deputy since 2006, had never before been involved in a shooting while on duty. Investigators also said Charleston County’s deputies do not wear body cameras — but dashboard cameras in their patrol cars may hold some clues helpful to the probe.

Tyner and another deputy who accompanied him to the home have been placed on administrative leave.

Hollywood is about 20 miles southwest of North Charleston, S.C., where police officer Thomas Slager faces murder charges in the shooting death of an unarmed man, Walter Scott, following a traffic stop. The incident was captured on a bystander’s cellphone videolast month — sparking even more national outcry over recent cases involving police shootings.

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